Budget 2021: What you need to know

Measures announced by Chancellor Rishi Sunak in the Budget.

Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

1. Covid-19

  • An extra £1.65 billion cash injection to ensure the Covid-19 vaccination roll-out in England continues to be a success.
  • £28 million to increase the UK’s capacity for vaccine testing, support for clinical trials and improve the UK’s ability to rapidly acquire samples of new variants of COVID-19.
  • £22 million for a world-leading study to test the effectiveness of combinations of different Covid-19 vaccines. This will also fund the world’s first study assessing the effectiveness of a third dose of vaccine to improve the response against current and future variants of COVID-19.
  • A further £5 million on top of a previous £9 million investment in clinical-scale mRNA manufacturing, to create a ‘library’ of vaccines that will work against Covid-19 variants for possible rapid response deployment.
  • Extending £500 Test and Trace support payments in England until the summer.

2. Protecting jobs and livelihoods

  • An extension of the Coronavirus Job Support Scheme to September 2021 across the UK.
  • An extension of the UK-wide Self Employment Income Support scheme to September 2021, with 600,000 more people who filed a tax return in 2019-20 now able to claim for the first time.
  • An extension to the temporary cut in Stamp Duty Land Tax in England and Northern Ireland until September will support the housing market and protect and create jobs.
  • A new mortgage guarantee scheme will enable all UK homebuyers secure a mortgage up to £600,000 with a 5% deposit.
  • £5 billion for new Restart Grants – a one off cash grant of up to £18,000 for hospitality, accommodation, leisure, personal care and gym businesses in England.
  • A new UK-wide Recovery Loan Scheme to make available loans between £25,001 and £10 million, and asset and invoice finance between £1,000 and £10 million, to help businesses of all sizes through the next stage of recovery.
  • Extension of the Film & TV Production Restart scheme in the UK, with an additional £300 million to support theatres, museums and other cultural organisations in England through the Culture Recovery Fund.
  • Six-month extension of the £20 per week Universal Credit uplift in Great Britain, with the Northern Ireland Executive receiving additional funding to match the increase. A one-off payment of £500 to eligible Working Tax Credit claimants across the UK.
  • Extension to the VAT cut to 5% for hospitality, accommodation and attractions across the UK until the end of September, followed by a 12.5% rate for a further six months until 31 March 2022.
  • 750,000 eligible businesses in the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors in England will benefit from business rates relief.
  • Extension of the apprenticeship hiring incentive in England to September 2021 and an increase of payment to £3,000.
  • £7 million for a new “flexi-job” apprenticeship programme in England, that will enable apprentices to work with a number of employers in one sector.
  • Additional £126 million for 40,000 more traineeships in England, funding high quality work placements and training for 16-24 year olds in 2021/22 academic year.
  • More than doubling the legal limit for single contactless payments, from £45 to £100

  • £10 million to support veterans with mental health needs across the UK.
  • £19 million to tackle domestic abuse in England and Wales, with funding for a network of ‘Respite Rooms’ to support homeless women and a programme to prevent reoffending.
  • £90 million funding to support our government-sponsored national museums in England due to the financial impact of Covid-19.
  • £300 million for major spectator sports, supporting clubs and governing bodies in England as fans begin to return to stadia.
  • Small and medium-sized employers in the UK will continue to be able to reclaim up to two weeks of eligible Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) costs per employee from the Government.
  • To further support the cashflow of businesses, the government is extending the loss carry back rules worth up to £760,000 per company.
  • £100 million for a new Taxpayer Protection Taskforce to crack-down on COVID fraudsters who have exploited UK Government support schemes.

3. Strengthening the public finances

  • Maintaining the income tax Personal Allowance and higher rate threshold from April 2022 until April 2026.
  • To balance the need to raise revenue with the objective of having an internationally competitive tax system, the rate of Corporation Tax will increase to 25%, which will remain the lowest rate in the G7. In order to support the recovery, the increase will not take effect until 2023. Businesses with profits of £50,000 or less, around 70% of actively trading companies, will continue to be taxed at 19% and a taper above £50,000 will be introduced so that only businesses with profits greater than £250,000 will be taxed at the full 25% rate.
  • Maintaining inheritance tax thresholds at their current levels until April 2026.
  • Fuel duty will be frozen for the 11th consecutive year.
  • Alcohol duties will be frozen across the board for the second year running saving drinkers £1.7 billion.
  • Capping the amount of SME payable R&D tax credit that a business can receive in any one year at £20,000 (plus three times the company’s total PAYE and NICs liability).
  • Maintaining the Lifetime Allowance at its current level of £1,073,100 until April 2026.
  • The adult ISA annual subscription limit for 2021-22 will remain unchanged at £20,000.

4. An investment-led recovery

  • Beginning April 2021, the new super-deduction will cut companies’ tax bill by 25p for every pound they invest in new equipment. This is worth around £25 billion to UK companies over the two-year period the super-deduction will be in full effect.
  • Eight new English Freeports will be based in East Midlands Airport, Felixstowe & Harwich, Humber, Liverpool City Region, Plymouth, Solent, Thames and Teesside.
  • The £375 million UK-wide ‘Future Fund: Breakthrough’ will invest in highly innovative companies such as those working in life sciences, quantum computing, or clean tech, that are aiming to raise at least £20 million of funding.
  • Reforms to the immigration system will help ambitious UK businesses attract the brightest and best international talent.
  • A new Help to Grow scheme to offer up to 130,000 companies across the UK a digital and management boost.
  • £2.8 million to support a UK and Ireland bid to host the 2030 World Cup and £25 million investment in UK grassroots sports, enough for around 700 new pitches.
  • Launching a review of Research & Development tax reliefs to make sure the UK remains a competitive location for cutting-edge research.
  • £20 million to fund a UK-wide competition to develop floating offshore wind demonstrators and help support the government’s aim to generate enough electricity from offshore wind to power every home by 2030.
  • £68 million to fund a UK-wide competition to deliver first-of-a-kind long-duration energy storage prototypes that will reduce the cost of net zero by storing excess low carbon energy over longer periods.
  • £4 million for a biomass feedstocks programme in the UK to identify ways to increase the production of green energy crops and forest products that can be used for energy.
  • Publication of the the government’s ‘Build Back Better: our plan for growth’.
  • Over £1 billion funding for a further 45 towns in England through the Towns Fund, supporting their long-term economic and social regeneration as well as their immediate recovery from the impacts of COVID-19.
  • £135 million to progress A66 Trans-Pennine upgrade.
  • £28 million to fund the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations in 2022, delivering a major celebration for the UK.
  • Plans for at least £15 billion of green gilt issuance in the coming financial year, to help finance critical projects to tackle climate change and other environmental challenges, fund important infrastructure investment, and create green jobs across the UK.
  • £150 million Community Ownership Fund will allow communities across the UK to invest to protect the assets that matter most to them such as pubs, theatres, shops, or local sports clubs.
  • £18.8 million to transform local cultural projects in Hartlepool, Carlisle, Wakefield and Yeovil.
  • Publication of the prospectus for the £4.8 billion UK-wide Levelling Up Fund, providing guidance for local areas on how to submit bids for the first round of funding starting in 21-22.

5. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland

  • Individuals and businesses in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland continue to be supported by the UK Government through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, self-employment grants, loan schemes and VAT cuts. Devolved administrations have received Barnett funding to provide support in areas of devolved responsibility.
  • The Budget confirms an additional £2.4 billion for the devolved administrations for 2021-22 through the Barnett formula. This is an additional £1.2 billion for the Scottish Government, £740 million for the Welsh Government, £410 million for the Northern Ireland Executive.
  • The devolved administrations will also receive £1.4 billion of funding in 2021-22 outside the Barnett formula.
  • £27 million in the Aberdeen Energy Transition Zone and £5 million in the Global Underwater Hub in Scotland, the first stage in delivering the North Sea Transition Deal.
  • Three Growth Deals in Scotland – Ayrshire, Argyll & Bute, and Falkirk – will receive funding more quickly.
  • £4.8 million to support the development of a demonstration hydrogen hub in Holyhead, Anglesey.
  • Up to £30 million for the Global Centre for Rail Excellence in Wales.
  • Three City and Growth Deals – in North-Wales, Mid-Wales and Swansea Bay – will receive funding more quickly.
  • Northern Ireland will benefit from the Corporation Tax exemption for the Northern Ireland Housing Executive, Northern Ireland’s biggest landlord.
  • Almost half of the £400 million New Deal for Northern Ireland funding has been allocated, subject to business cases, to: new systems for supermarkets and small traders to manage new trading arrangements; building greater resilience in medicine supply chains; promoting Northern Ireland’s goods and services overseas; and supporting skills development.
  • £5 million to extend the Tackling Paramilitary Programme in 2021-22.

NOW IS THE TIME FOR BUSINESS OWNERS TO PREPARE FOR THE COST OF REDUNDANCIES’

‘NOW IS THE TIME FOR BUSINESS OWNERS TO PREPARE FOR THE COST OF REDUNDANCIES’

Press release. For immediate release.
23 February 2021

Smaller businesses looking to reduce their workforces should urgently prepare for the costs of redundancies, following changes to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme made late last year.

That’s the warning from human resources experts The HR Dept, which provides human resources advice and support for more than 6,500 small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) across the UK and Ireland.

Rule changes last December mean that furlough grants can no longer contribute towards notice pay, a fact of which The HR Dept believes many smaller businesses are unaware.

Its experts believe this will prove a major challenge for some small businesses, many of which are struggling to survive this crisis, once the furlough period comes to an end in April.

Serena May, director at The HR Dept Eastbourne, Brighton and Hove, said: “Last year, employers could use the furlough grant to cover the redundancy notice period, topping up the remaining 20 per cent to full pay. Employers might not realise that this 80 per cent contribution towards notice can’t happen again.

“As things stand, changes in furlough rules mean that the employer will not be able to use the furlough grant and will need to pay the notice in full, without Government support.

“Other employers may not understand employees’ statutory rights to notice periods, or age factoring when considering redundancy pay.

“In any case, employers need to be aware of these issues and start preparing now, as time for consultation processes and time and cost for statutory notice need to be factored in.

“Particularly where the employees facing redundancy have long service – this is likely, as they are the most experienced and will have been the most expensive to make redundant last year and remain on furlough – the coming costs could well push businesses under.”

Having continually welcomed the Government’s efforts to support the UK’s small business network through this crisis, The HR Dept has played an important role in lobbying for change to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) since it was rolled out last spring.

The company successfully campaigned for the introduction of a flexible element to the scheme, as well as helping ensure that the changes happened in July, rather than August as originally planned.

Now it is recommending a further change to the rules to allow the furlough grant to contribute towards notice pay again, as was the situation last year.

Serena May said: “If the furlough grants could be put towards notice pay again, employers could potentially start the redundancy process now. Then, if the situation proves less dire than expected, they simply retain the employee and stop the notice period – at no additional cost to the business or the taxpayer. If the redundancy still needs to take place, much of the notice pay cost has already been absorbed.

“It wouldn’t cost the Government any extra – the Exchequer is already contributing furlough periods during this time anyway.  However, with the reality of redundancies rapidly approaching, this measure would let small business take those decisions now, so we can avoid a mass of insolvencies further down the line.

“Otherwise, there is a serious risk that businesses which delay the redundancy process until the end of the furlough period will face significant costs, especially regarding long-serving employees.

“These could sink the whole business, with the Government picking up all the redundancy costs, through the National Insurance Fund. It’s not a winning situation for anyone involved – the business or the employees most importantly, as well as the taxpayer and the Government itself.”

 

For more information about The HR Dept click here hrdept.co.uk.

Issued by:

Rupert Janisch, Turn the Tables PR + Comms

m: 07929 660 586   |   t: 01174 033543   |   e: rupert@turnthetablespr.com

Roadmap to lockdown easing

Roadmap out of lockdown

Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

Guidance

COVID-19 Response – Spring 2021 (Summary)

Published 22 February 2021

From 8 March, people in England will see restrictions start to lift and the government’s four-step roadmap offer a route back to a more normal life.

The success of the vaccination programme is one factor – so far over 17 million people have had their jabs – but by no means the whole story. The public have also risen to the challenge of suppressing COVID-19: by obeying the law; staying at home; getting tested when needed; isolating when required, and following the ‘hands, face, space’ and ‘letting fresh air in’ guidance.

Taken together, this means that even though absolute case numbers remain relatively high, we will be able to begin relaxing the current strict lockdown. While we must all remain vigilant – in particular against the threat from new COVID-19 variants – and continue to protect the NHS, a safe exit from lockdown can begin. It will take place in four steps; and at each step, we plan to lift restrictions across the whole of England at the same time.

In implementing this plan we will be guided by data, not dates, so that we do not risk a surge in infections that would put unsustainable pressure on the NHS. For that reason, all the dates in the roadmap are indicative and subject to change. There will be a minimum of five weeks between each step: four weeks for the scientific data to reflect the changes in restrictions and to be analysed; followed by one week’s advance notice of the restrictions that will be eased.

Only when the government is sure that it is safe to move from one step to the next will the final decision be made. The decision will be based on four tests:

  • the vaccine deployment programme continues successfully
  • evidence shows vaccines are sufficiently effective in reducing hospitalisations and deaths in those vaccinated
  • infection rates do not risk a surge in hospitalisations which would put unsustainable pressure on the NHS
  • our assessment of the risks is not fundamentally changed by new Variants of Concern

The government will continue to protect the public by ensuring local outbreaks are managed quickly and effectively and that we combat new dangerous variants, both within the UK and at the border. The government will also continue to support families and businesses throughout the steps set out in the roadmap – details of which will be set out by the Chancellor in the Budget on 3 March.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-response-spring-2021/covid-19-response-spring-2021-summary

Step 1 – 8 and 29 March

Changes on 8 March

Education

In Step 1, our priority is to ensure that all children and students return safely to face-to-face education in schools and colleges from 8 March. Childcare and children’s supervised activities can also resume where necessary to enable parents to work or engage in similar activities. We are introducing twice-weekly rapid testing for secondary and college pupils – in addition to regular testing for all teachers – to reduce the chance of the virus spreading in schools.

Higher Education students at English universities on practical courses can also return from 8 March.

Social contact

People will be allowed to leave home for recreation and exercise outdoors with their household or support bubble, if they are eligible for one, or with one person from outside their household. Care home residents will also be allowed one regular visitor.

 

Changes on 29 March

Social contact

The evidence shows that it is safer for people to meet outdoors rather than indoors. And this is why from 29 March, when most schools start to break up for the Easter holidays, outdoor gatherings (including in private gardens) of either 6 people (the Rule of 6) or 2 households will also be allowed, making it easier for friends and families to meet outside.

Business and activities

Outdoor sports facilities such as tennis and basketball courts, and open-air swimming pools, will also be allowed to reopen, and people will be able to take part in formally organised outdoor sports.

Travel

The ‘stay at home’ rule will end on 29 March but many restrictions will remain in place. People should continue to work from home where they can and minimise the number of journeys they make where possible, avoiding travel at the busiest times and routes. Travel abroad will continue to be prohibited, other than for a small number of permitted reasons. Holidays abroad will not be allowed, given it will remain important to manage the risk of imported variants and protect the vaccination programme. The government has launched a new taskforce to review global travel which will report on 12 April.

Step 2 – not before 12 April

 

Business and activities

Step 2, which will be no earlier than 12 April, will see the opening of non-essential retail; personal care premises such as hairdressers and nail salons; and public buildings, including libraries and community centres. Indoor leisure facilities such as gyms will also reopen (but only for use by people on their own or in household groups); as will most outdoor attractions and settings including outdoor hospitality venues, zoos, theme parks, and drive-in cinemas. Self-contained accommodation such as campsites and holiday lets, where indoor facilities are not shared with other households, can also reopen.

 

Hospitality venues will be allowed to serve people outdoors at Step 2 and there will be no need for customers to order a substantial meal with alcoholic drinks and no curfew, although customers must order, eat and drink while seated (‘table service’). Wider social contact rules will apply in all these settings to prevent indoor mixing between different households.

Events

While funerals can continue with up to 30 mourners, the number of people able to attend weddings, receptions and commemorative events such as wakes will rise to 15.

Step 3 – not before 17 May

 

Social contact

As part of Step 3, no earlier than 17 May, the government will look to continue easing limits on seeing friends and family wherever possible, allowing people to decide on the appropriate level of risk for their circumstances.

This means that most legal restrictions on meeting others outdoors will be lifted – although gatherings of over 30 people will remain illegal. Indoors, the Rule of 6 or 2 households will apply – we will keep under review whether it is safe to increase this.

As soon as possible and by no later than Step 3, we will also update the advice on social distancing between friends and family, including hugging. But until this point, people should continue to keep their distance from anyone not in their household or support bubble.

Business and activities

Most businesses in all but the highest risk sectors will be able to reopen. In all sectors, COVID-Secure guidance will remain in place and businesses may not cater for groups bigger than the legal limits. Indoor hospitality will reopen – and as in Step 2, venues will not have to serve a substantial meal with alcoholic drinks; nor will there be a curfew. Customers will, however, have to order, eat and drink while seated.

 

Other indoor locations to open up in Step 3 include indoor entertainment venues such as cinemas and children’s play areas; the rest of the accommodation sector, including hotels, hostels and B&Bs; and indoor adult group sports and exercise classes. The government will also allow some larger performances and sporting events in indoor venues with a capacity of 1,000 people or half-full (whichever is a lower number), and in outdoor venues with a capacity of 4,000 people or half-full (whichever is a lower number). In the largest outdoor seated venues, where crowds can be spread out, up to 10,000 people will be able to attend (or a quarter-full, whichever is lower).

Events

Up to 30 people will be able to attend weddings, receptions and wakes, as well as funerals. This limit will also apply to other types of significant life events including bar mitzvahs and christenings.

Review of social distancing

Finally, before Step 4 begins, the government will complete a review of social distancing and other long-term measures that have been put in place to cut transmission. This will inform decisions on the timing and circumstances under which the rules on 1 metre plus, the wearing of face coverings and other measures may be lifted. This will also inform guidance on working from home – which should continue wherever possible until this review is complete.

Step 4 – not before 21 June

 

Social contact

By Step 4 which will take place no earlier than 21 June, the government hopes to be in a position to remove all legal limits on social contact.

Business, activities and events

We hope to reopen remaining premises, including nightclubs, and ease the restrictions on large events and performances that apply in Step 3. This will be subject to the results of a scientific Events Research Programme to test the outcome of certain pilot events through the spring and summer, where we will trial the use of testing and other techniques to cut the risk of infection. The same Events Research Programme will guide decisions on whether all limits can be removed on weddings and other life events.

As we move through each of these phases in the roadmap, we must all remember that COVID-19 remains a part of our lives. We are going to have to keep living our lives differently to keep ourselves and others safe. We must carry on with ‘hands, face, space’. Comply with the COVID-Secure measures that remain in place. Meet outdoors when we can and keep letting fresh air in. Get tested when needed. Get vaccinated when offered. If we all continue to play our part, we will be that bit closer to a future that is more familiar.

Energy Saving Grants for East Sussex Businesses

Energy Saving Grants available for East Sussex Businesses!

The UK is committed to becoming net-zero carbon by 2050. Have you thought about what your contribution will be? If you own a business, how will you lower your energy costs and reduce your environmental impact?

Well, help is at hand. East Sussex businesses can apply for grant funding to install energy saving measures. To find out how you can benefit, contact LED-UK Lighting Ltd for more information. We pride ourselves on being experts in lowering energy costs for all types of businesses.

An example: electricity bills for warehouses and industrial units are typically high but switching to a LED Lighting System will reduce that bill by 71% in most cases.

LED-UK can also help with your funding application and we offer a FREE site survey up front to establish your business requirements.

Please contact LED Lighting Ltd on 01424 222200 or email enquiries@led-uk.c.uk

LED-UK Lighting Ltd
LED-UK LogoTrades

LED-UK is an established East Sussex designer, supplier, and installer of LED lighting for commercial properties in the public and private sectors.

Switching to LED Lighting can save up to 71% on your energy bill and reduce your carbon emissions. We offer a “FREE” survey and energy savings report to show the savings you would obtain by switching to LED Lighting.
For businesses based in East Sussex and Kent, a grant is available that will pay 40% of the costs to install these energy saving products.

What is NEW in our business?

 UV-C Disinfection Technology

With the ongoing global pandemic against Covid-19, we have spotted an opportunity to extend our range of LED products, to include UV-C Disinfection lighting. Our lighting solutions will kill 99.99% of all known bacteria and viruses (including Covid-19), micro-organisms and pathogens in a fast, efficient, and effective way. As a result, organisations and businesses become safer, and staff and customers are reassured.

We have a range of UV-C products for every size of business and can offer these on a competitive finance deal (subject to t’s & c’s). If businesses do not wish to purchase the equipment, we also offer a UV-C disinfection service where our trained staff can come to your premises with UV-C equipment and sterilise your building for you.

Mr-LED website

For all your lighting needs – this website is aimed at consumers and offers quality LED lighting at a reasonable cost.

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New Year recommendations from Hughes Solicitors

East Sussex private client lawyers’ recommendations for 2021 resolutions

4 Jan 2021 | Private client law

It is that time again when we make our New Year’s Resolutions for the year ahead. Perhaps you intend to learn a new skill or take more exercise. But what about looking beyond the next 12 months… have you made plans to look after your finances, your family and your health in your later years?

Our private client team in Heathfield, East Sussex has suggested five essential considerations you should plan for in your New Year’s resolutions:

Retirement finances

Hilary HughesHilary Hughes highlights how you could easily find yourself having 30 or 40 years of “old age” following retirement, so it is vital to plan how much income and capital you will need to fund your lifestyle and future plans. You may want to help family members who are struggling financially or put something aside for your grandchildren.

Using your inheritance tax allowances wisely is crucial. You have a yearly personal allowance for tax free gifts but some larger gifts will only be tax exempt if you survive for seven years. Take legal advice to make sure you have planned properly for retirement and your relatives do not face a heavy inheritance tax bill when you are gone.

Power of attorney for property and financial affairs

Cerrig ParrCerrig Parr outlines how making a lasting power of attorney for property and financial affairs means that you can appoint a loved one to make decisions for you if you became mentally incapable in the future.

A finance lasting power of attorney will cover decisions such as selling your house, paying your bills and managing your bank account.

If you are unlucky and lose the ability to make these decisions for yourself, then without a lasting power of attorney in place, your family will have no option but to apply to the Court of Protection to decide who should make these important decisions for you. This procedure is lengthy and expensive, costing approximately £2,000 – £3000 initially and the court may not appoint the person of your choice.

Paying for care

Dee BeniansDee Benians reminds us that although we are living longer, our bodies are still deteriorating physically and mentally, meaning that more of us will require professional care in our later years.

Your priority might be to protect your home from being used to pay your care fees so that you can pass it on to your children.  If this is the case, you may wish to investigate the use of a trust in your will.

Alternatively, your main concern might be to ensure you can afford to live in the care home of your choice without being reliant on your children for financial help. Either way, you will need to plan your finances and make sure they are arranged in a tax efficient way.

 

Power of attorney for health and welfare decisions

Ruth WeaverRuth Weaver highlights how important it is to let people know your wishes and feelings about issues such as hospital treatment, physical illness, mental impairment, permanent unconsciousness and the receipt or donation of organs and other tissue.

A lasting power of attorney for health and welfare can cover decisions such as where you live, who can visit you and what medical treatment you receive.

If you want to refuse certain kinds of medical treatment in the future, you can also make a legally binding advance decision. This is a specific document, sometimes called a living will, or it may be set out in a lasting power of attorney.

You may also wish to specify where you would like to die; at home, in a hospice or in hospital. The only thing you cannot do legally is ask for your life to be ended.

Making a will

Sadvi Baichoo emphasises how the purpose of a will is to clarify your intentions to the people you leave behind. Without a will you could leave problems for your family to sort out after you die. People living longer are more likely to remarry with second or even third families to provide for, and disputes can arise in the absence of clear instructions.

There may be a charitable cause that is close to your heart, but will your family feel the same way if you leave it for them to decide?

Your will not only sets out your wishes for who will inherit your property and finances, but you can also specify your funeral arrangements, who will look after minor children, what will happen to pets and who will make sure all your wishes are carried out.

If you do not make a will, the intestacy rules will determine who receives your assets. These rules are very often problematic and do not make use of inheritance tax allowances effectively. The intestacy rules also do not cover guardians for children, funeral wishes or arrangements for pets and this is an additional area where disputes can arise.

Summary

It is important to plan ahead to make the financial, legal and practical consequences of old age, illness and death much easier for you and your family to deal with. Addressing these issues at an early stage will give you the peace of mind that you can enjoy your life, right up to your 100th birthday and beyond.

If you would like help with your future plans, please contact our private client team in Heathfield, East Sussex on 01435 890 101 or email info@hugheslaw.co.uk  for more information about lifetime gifts, advance decisions, lasting powers of attorney, wills and trusts.

This article is for general information purposes only and does not constitute legal or professional advice. Please note that the law may have changed since the date this article was published.

Hughes Solicitors
Legal services

Established in 2009, our lawyers look after clients who live and work in Heathfield and the surrounding villages.

Our focus is on advising private clients on their legal affairs, including:

- moving home or buy-to-let investments;
- property development;
- making a will, power of attorney, and inheritance planning;
- probate and estate administration; and
- care of the elderly and management of their affairs in later life.

We enjoy working for our clients, getting to know them personally and providing the best possible legal advice.

Hughes Solicitors has built its reputation on the quality of advice and the personal service which we provide.  As a result, many of our new clients come to us through word of mouth and recommendation by clients or professional advisers.

Business hours: Monday to Friday 8.45am to 5pm

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